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Business Unplugged™
This blog features Carol Roth's tough love on business and entrepreneurship, as well as insights from Carol's community of contributors.

One Success Strategy from Two Great Minds

Written By: Catherine Morgan | No Comments

step by stepIn our infinitely distracted world, being able to focus is getting harder and harder for many of us. However, we also are learning to appreciate its importance more and more.

I think you will enjoy Carol’s recent article on entrepreneur.com. “Warren Buffett and Bill Gates’s Top Secret to Success.” Carol begins:

“HBO’s new documentary Becoming Warren Buffett covers the billionaire’s journey from an entrepreneurial boy to one of the wealthiest people in the entire world (including, depending on the year, being the wealthiest person in the world).

The documentary also focuses on his friendship with another of the world’s wealthiest men, Bill Gates. There’s a scene where Buffett and Gates had met early on and were sitting at a table, when they were both asked to write down on a piece of paper the one thing that they each felt attributed most to their success.

Surely enough, Buffett and Gates had written the same word down on their respective papers: focus.

This shouldn’t come as a coincidence. Many of the most highly successful people in the world I have spoken to attribute a singular focus — a commitment to the pursuit of one main goal or arena — to their success.

In fact, it’s how we often determine success. Historically, renaissance men who were well-rounded in a number of pursuits were well-regarded for the breadth of their knowledge and endeavors. Now, we often equate success with being the best or amongst the best in a peer group.

I am the poster child for “do as I say, not as I do,” given my sheer number of current varied pursuits, but early in my career, I made my first million from very specific focus. Over the past two decades, I have been the most successful when I have been the most focused.

So, how can you stay focused in a world with so many distractions?

Set a concrete goal or focus. When I was in college, accumulating $40,000 in college debt, I set a goal to have a $1 million net worth by age 30. I knew exactly what my goal was. Then, I created a plan of milestones to achieve that goal, and I did not deviate from it until I had reached it. It’s much easier for you to focus if you set a clear path for yourself up front and stay relentlessly committed to it.

Follow your own path. Warren Buffett has had more success as an investor than any other individual in history. Daily, there are recommendations to act a certain way, but Warren says that he doesn’t follow the path or the advice of other investors. He sticks to exactly the types of businesses he understands well and only acts on an investment if he feels there is a need to, which means he has made very few investments or “trades” over the course of his many decades-long investment career. If you know what works for you, you shouldn’t be distracted by what others are doing.”  

You can read the rest of the post here.

Article written by
Catherine Morgan is the editor of Business Unplugged ™, an engaging speaker, and the founder of Point A to Point B Transitions Inc., a virtual provider of coaching services to individuals who are in business or career transition. Catherine is the author of the eBook Re-Launch You: Discovering Your Point B and Embracing Possibility. An experienced independent consultant and former employee of three of the former Big Five consulting firms, Catherine combines strategy development with accountability coaching. Her productivity tips and career transition advice have been featured on WGN AM 720 and WIND AM 560 The Answer in Chicago, and on WCHE AM 1520 in the Philadelphia area. Catherine speaks frequently on topics related to productivity, career transition, small business, and entrepreneurship. She doesn’t take herself seriously, but takes her subject matter very seriously.